Finding Main Street Toolkit Available

The full book club toolkit for Dar Williams’ What I Found in a Thousand Towns is now available! Use the toolkit to build “positive proximity,” and start local conversations around the key identity-building assets in your community–who knows what next steps you will take.

What I Found in a Thousand Towns emphasizes the role of projects and individuals in fostering strong community identity. Each chapter features a different group of assets ranging from local food to community spaces. The structure provides an opportunity for Main Street districts to convene and highlight a diverse group of partners, celebrating their work, strengthening alliances and inviting new participants.

Identify potential projects as a result and apply to pitch them for project funding in the 2019 Idea Pitch at Downtown Intersections.

fms tools

HOW TO GET INVOLVED: Invite a local book club, library or civic group to partner with your Main Street. Create some buzz reinforcing the value of the work you are doing. Using the Virginia videos and examples from the book, shine a celebratory light on your own local efforts and community partners. With the toolkit, you can pretty easily set up your own informal mini-conference.  Contact Doug Jackson at (804) 418-9878 or Douglas.Jackson@dhcd.virginia.gov for assistance and brainstorming support.

Afraid you do not have enough readers? Do not worry, you can use the videos to supplement and start the conversation. Launched throughout the fall of 2018 via Facebook Live conversations, the chapter videos have received more than 20,000 views on Facebook. In 2019, DHCD will promote the videos through a Finding Main Street social media campaign featuring quotes and images from the interviews conducted as part of the project with more than 80 Main Street leaders. This campaign will lead up to the 2019 Downtown Intersections and the Idea Pitch competition.

 

 

Small Business Resource Guide now available

The Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) has developed a Small Business Resource Guide that provides information on many of the items that new or expanding small businesses and entrepreneurs need. This includes financing programs, grant programs, business development resources and training opportunities, as well as university entrepreneurship programs that are available to the public.

The guide is a living document, so it will be updated often as new programs and resources become available or we are made aware of appropriate available resources. The guide can be found on the Resources and Reports page of the Virginia Main Street blog, or click here for a copy.

If you know of a great resource – federal, state, regional or local – that should be added, please let us know!

Collaborate for Impact

If you want to grow your volunteer and donor pipeline, you must reach out to your locals and create an opportunity for input.  Listen and find out what they love about where they live.  If they see their ideas implemented, they are more likely to contribute their time and money, making Main Street’s mission much easier to achieve.

Community engagement works best where it is an ongoing cumulative process enabling relationships and trust to build and strengthen over time.  There is a range of levels and techniques for participation. Resources are popping up to make it easier to navigate through it all.

From the Main Street America network, there is the new publication Community Engagement for Main Street Transformation, a guiding framework for understanding how to launch or strengthen the community engagement efforts.  Thankfully, it does not stop there.  Here are few worthwhile articles and resources:

What works for your community?

Want a Stronger, Vibrant Nonprofit Board of Directors?

How does your board keep itself strong and dynamic?  How does it deal with difficult challenges? 

A team is only as strong as its members, yet boards often lose sight of the needs of individual board volunteers.  Building a team is also a critical activity.  However, in a quest to plan, fund raise, organize and meet the expectations of the community, the management of human resources within a voluntary Main Street organization is often overlooked.

The Maine Association of Nonprofits has perfectly summed up the critical importance of regular self-assessments for boards:

A strong, vibrant board of directors is a clear indicator of a healthy organization.  Yet even the best organizations need a periodic check-up to ensure that they cannot just survive but will really thrive in today’s environment.  To check your board’s vital signs, or to put in place practices and strategies for a healthy and energized board, the best place to start is with a board self-assessment.

Self-assessments may feel threatening to some board members, and getting buy-in to devote time to the process take some time. In the end, an assessment brings to light the areas for improvement and makes it easier to celebrate mission achievements.
How can your board most effectively use the strengths of each person on your team? Find out here from the National Council of Nonprofits.

Historic Manassas Inc. Ribbon Cutting